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Oklahoma Governor Signs Medical Marijuana Bill

Friday, March 15, 2019   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Lexi Dills
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REPUBLICAN Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a bill Thursday that establishes new regulations for medical marijuana, which was legalized by voters in June.

The bill, supported by both Democrats and Republicans, establishes packing and labeling guidelines and also prohibits employers from hiring or firing workers based on medical marijuana use, except in the case of "safety sensitive jobs."

These jobs include positions involving the operation of machinery, firefighting or handling hazardous materials. 

"Without this bill, you have a very real possibility that people are taking tainted medication," Sen. Greg McCortney, a Republican who co-authored the bill, told Oklahoma's News 4, referring to the bill's inventory testing and labeling requirements.

"You have a very real possibility that people are taking medication that they don't know what's in it, and you have a real possibility that people are driving school buses or forklifts or heavy machinery equipment that are showing up to work high and their employers cannot do anything about that," McCortney said.

According to Tulsa World, Stitt applauded state lawmakers for bringing all stakeholders, from medical marijuana users to law enforcement officials, together to form the legislation.

"This will not be the end of our efforts to get this done right, but it is a framework and a good step forward," Stitt said. 

Medical marijuana is now legal in 34 states plus Washington, D.C., and some states have made recreational pot legal as well.

SOURCE: https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/articles/2019-03-15/oklahoma-governor-signs-medical-marijuana-bill?src=usn_fb&fbclid=IwAR2EvgiEHs4AzT8HSLkp13G9gImoUYu_pBYKZLsBN54-5dkNUO0Zp69aDTg

The Civic Report, online, March 15th, 2019.

 

REPUBLICAN Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a bill Thursday that establishes new regulations for medical marijuana, which was legalized by voters in June.

The bill, supported by both Democrats and Republicans, establishes packing and labeling guidelines and also prohibits employers from hiring or firing workers based on medical marijuana use, except in the case of "safety sensitive jobs."

These jobs include positions involving the operation of machinery, firefighting or handling hazardous materials. 

"Without this bill, you have a very real possibility that people are taking tainted medication," Sen. Greg McCortney, a Republican who co-authored the bill, told Oklahoma's News 4, referring to the bill's inventory testing and labeling requirements.

"You have a very real possibility that people are taking medication that they don't know what's in it, and you have a real possibility that people are driving school buses or forklifts or heavy machinery equipment that are showing up to work high and their employers cannot do anything about that," McCortney said.

According to Tulsa World, Stitt applauded state lawmakers for bringing all stakeholders, from medical marijuana users to law enforcement officials, together to form the legislation.

"This will not be the end of our efforts to get this done right, but it is a framework and a good step forward," Stitt said. 

Medical marijuana is now legal in 34 states plus Washington, D.C., and some states have made recreational pot legal as well


 

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